I just started BarkBox for Zander. My first experience was a little wobbly. I went online and started a subscription, wanting to make the monthly payments, but it charged me the full annual fee of 235$. The problem was fixed pretty quickly and I got my refund. And a free regular box because they couldn't stop the order. So that was really great. I had to get everything straightened out over the phone because the website didn't give me the option to do the Super Chewer box with monthly payments. So after getting everything figured out I got my free box yesterday. My dog went absolutely crazy with joy. He loved the treats and has not put them down yet. Now being that this was a regular box, I already expected my dog to rip through them right away because he is a super chewer.
My Lab/whippet mixed pup Nora (45 pounds, 8 years) rarely cares for any kind of traditional dog toy. She’s intimidated by toys that squeak, and toys that hit the floor with a loud thud. She doesn’t play fetch unless other dogs are around. However, she does take to treats meant for chewing. After trying bully sticks (hurt her gums), antlers (made a terrible sound against her teeth), and others, I came across the Himalayan Dog Chew: a softer chew made from yak and cow milk. It’s still tough enough that it lasts her a few days of on and off chewing but soft enough that I’m not worried it’ll hurt her mouth. Once the chew reaches the last nubbin—which you don’t want your dog to swallow whole—you can briefly pop it into the microwave to soften it into a cheesy treat.
What comes each month seems to be tied into a holiday or time of year. For example, the BarkBox my dog received last week related to the Chinese New Year and contained treats like "Chompsticks" and a squeaker toy of a stuffed dragon. There are usually at least 2 themed toys, 2 themed smaller packages of treats, and at least 1 generic treat like a chew bone. The treats are marketed as "healthy snacks" like fruit chews and dried salmon. (If you get dried salmon, watch out. It smells! My dog loved it, however.) In addition to treats and toys, dog-related items may be included. We received a small treat jar and a water bottle to use when out walking.
“It’s a fun surprise for me and the pups,” said owner Seton. “There’s always something for both my dogs. Walter goes through a toy a week, so the new toys that come every month are always a big hit. And Lily gets to enjoy the treats. It keeps my treat supply well stocked; I think I’m out of treats and then remember I have some in the pantry squirreled away from last month’s box.”
Fine Print: Each box contains dog training gear, including a halti harness and a treat pouch, dog training exercises and lessons, plus training games designed for the whole family to enjoy. They even offer bite prevention lessons and a dog body language card game that can help teach your kids how to read and respect your dog (while still having fun)! Good Dog In a Box provides the tools you need to ensure a well-integrated canine/human family.

We hand select our toys with power chewers in mind. We could get all nylon super tough toys that are close to indestructable, but we know and understand that even tough chewing pups don’t always love the hard, extra durable toys and we want your pup to enjoy their goodies! So we search for extra durable products that your pup will love and that will last longer than your average plush toy.
Claire's and Emmy's thoughts: First off, every one of these boxes helps other dogs in need, which is just so incredibly awesome and something you can feel good about. Barkbox donates 10% of profits to different shelters and rescues in the US and Canada; Dapper Dog donates $1 per box different rescues, shelters, and other pet organizations; and PupJoy donates $2 from every subscription box to the Bissell Pet Foundation, which works with rescues to provide resources for pet adoption, spay/neuter programs, microchipping, and foster care. Yay for giving back!

The BarkBox Dog Parent Survey was conducted by Kelton Global, a leading global insights research firm, between October 28th and November 4th, 2016 among 1,006 nationally representative Americans with dogs ages 18 and over, using an e-mail invitation and an online survey.  Quotas are set to ensure a reliable representation of the U.S. population 18 and over.
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