My C/S rep was nice and answered my question, but I was not happy with the answer. When we started, referred friends got a free box and we received a free box. That has changed and we were not notified. I referred a friend and they did not get a free box so they did not sign up. It made me look foolish. If I would have known I would have referred them, but not told them they would get a free first box.
What comes each month seems to be tied into a holiday or time of year. For example, the BarkBox my dog received last week related to the Chinese New Year and contained treats like "Chompsticks" and a squeaker toy of a stuffed dragon. There are usually at least 2 themed toys, 2 themed smaller packages of treats, and at least 1 generic treat like a chew bone. The treats are marketed as "healthy snacks" like fruit chews and dried salmon. (If you get dried salmon, watch out. It smells! My dog loved it, however.) In addition to treats and toys, dog-related items may be included. We received a small treat jar and a water bottle to use when out walking.
So what's the best way for a Slickdealer to get a BarkBox subscription? My recommendation is to sign up for the 12 month plan to lock in the $21/box price. Skip months when you've got too many toys, and feel at ease knowing you can cancel at any time. Basically, for the price of two generic toys from the pet store, you can get a themed box of curated goodies for your favorite fur baby.
Ask a handful of businesses whether their service that allows the option of subscribing to boxes of goods is a "subscription box service," several will likely explain why they are not. Stitch Fix eschewed the label when marketing its public offering to investors, sources have told CNBC. (Stitch Fix offers customers the chance to buy without a subscription or change the frequency of their subscription.) Amazon similarly contends its Amazon prime wardrobe service is not a subscription box service.

I have been a BarkBox subscriber for 4 years and have previously found them to be mildly inefficient but the billing is accurate, the toys are cute and the packaging is tidy. However, I recently placed a gift order to BarkBox and things have gone badly. I got a delivery eta of a week out. Package not received 2 weeks later, multiple (5) follow-up emails entirely ignored by BarkBox. Response that finally came cited “mass email” to all subscribers (never received, although I continue to receive lots of sales emails from BarkBox) and “ongoing warehouse inventory”, and hopes that the box will ship in the next week or so. There is no mechanism for expediting support requests, and the front line folks appear to working from scripts intended to appease and retain customers, regardless of whether or not the problem can be addressed.

After launching in 2011, Barkbox saw more than $1 million in revenues per month after only 2 years in business. By February 2014, they reached $25 million in revenue per year. It’s no wonder so many other monthly dog box companies popped up after Barkbox’s initial (and continuing) success. Here are the features that make Barkbox a winner for you and your pooch:
PupJoy is the treat better box for your dog. Their concierge approach gives you unmatched ability to customize to the unique needs of your dog. With two box sizes ranging from $29 to $44, each month they will delight your pup with curated deliveries of super high quality, artisan treats, toys & accessories. And they have a huge charitable program for rescue dogs and AYA breast cancer patients, the PupJoy Care Pack.
Since your dog is pretty much going to always love what you give them, ultimately choosing a dog subscription box is all about what ***you*** want. If you're someone who loves a theme and wants treats and toys at an affordable price, BarkBox is for you. If you want a mix of treats, toys, and wearables for your pup, then The Dapper Dog is a pretty solid bet. If you're someone who loves customization for a great deal, then PupJoy could be up your alley.
The BarkBox Dog Parent Survey was conducted by Kelton Global, a leading global insights research firm, between October 28th and November 4th, 2016 among 1,006 nationally representative Americans with dogs ages 18 and over, using an e-mail invitation and an online survey.  Quotas are set to ensure a reliable representation of the U.S. population 18 and over.
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