I just started BarkBox for Zander. My first experience was a little wobbly. I went online and started a subscription, wanting to make the monthly payments, but it charged me the full annual fee of 235$. The problem was fixed pretty quickly and I got my refund. And a free regular box because they couldn't stop the order. So that was really great. I had to get everything straightened out over the phone because the website didn't give me the option to do the Super Chewer box with monthly payments. So after getting everything figured out I got my free box yesterday. My dog went absolutely crazy with joy. He loved the treats and has not put them down yet. Now being that this was a regular box, I already expected my dog to rip through them right away because he is a super chewer.
“When you tell customers when they should expect their shipments, they’re pretty good at holding you accountable to that,” Snowden says. But the homegrown fulfillment solution BarkBox was using made it difficult to communicate with customers when delivery information changed, and nearly impossible to get timely feedback when something went wrong. In the event of a delay, the information might not reach the customer until it was too late, and worse still, the customer would oftentimes reach out to the carrier’s customer support to get help. “The carriers of course do everything they can, but we as a brand lost the control over that experience,” Snowden says.

The study suggests that the craziest dog people might go into withdrawal when they are away from their dog and lean on technology for quick fixes. Many dog people admit they have watched their dog on a webcam (17%) or Skyped or FaceTimed with them while they were away (14%). “This is especially true of Millennials, who are more likely than non-Millennials (24% vs. 13%) to watch their dog on a webcam. In fact, Millennials are nearly three times as likely as their older counterparts (23% vs. 8%) to Skype or FaceTime their dog.”
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