Nothing beats a game of fetch, and a good ball should be in every dog's toy box. From our wide variety of styles, sizes, colors, textures, even sounds, you are sure to find the perfect ball for your game! For something less ordinary, you can also choose between different styles of latex, rubber, and vinyl dog toys, in shapes like bones, fire hoses, hydrants, and animals.

That’s not because Reggie doesn’t like it. It’s actually his favorite. I’ve spoiled our dog with more toys than I care to admit, but he regularly trots up to me with the Hol-ee Roller for a game of fetch. I’d learned about the ball from friends we’d dog-sat for; their two Shih Tzus were always dropped off with one apiece. Yes, two dogs, two toys. It was easy to see why the pups didn’t want to share: The Hol-ee Roller is a hybrid bouncy ball and chew toy, with big holes that make it easy for smaller mouths to catch and grip and fling about. The rubber is durable but not inflexibly hard, so errant tosses aren’t a breaking hazard, and the ball’s squishiness absorbs its own noise and shock, which is nice news for your downstairs neighbor.


Based out of New York, New York, BarkBox is a subscription-based online service where members receive monthly surprises for their dogs, consisting of all-natural treats, hygiene products, and toys. The service is for dogs of all sizes, including puppies, medium-sized adults, or even large breeds such as Great Danes. As such, BarkBox carefully crafts each of your monthly boxes to your specific dog’s size—and because you never know what you’re going to get, each of the 4-6 items you receive will always be a surprise.
Andrew Chen is a longtime PC gamer, an automotive journalist and an avid deal hunter. His first PC had an 80 megahertz processor with 4 megabytes of RAM, light years away from the powerhouse gaming rigs he builds today. You can follow Andrew's high-speed sports car adventures over at 6SpeedOnline.com. As a Slickdealer for over 10 years, nothing makes him more excited than getting a freebie!

The study suggests that the craziest dog people might go into withdrawal when they are away from their dog and lean on technology for quick fixes. Many dog people admit they have watched their dog on a webcam (17%) or Skyped or FaceTimed with them while they were away (14%). “This is especially true of Millennials, who are more likely than non-Millennials (24% vs. 13%) to watch their dog on a webcam. In fact, Millennials are nearly three times as likely as their older counterparts (23% vs. 8%) to Skype or FaceTime their dog.”
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