Thinking that maybe I needed to communicate dog to dog, I had my 4 Goldens and 1 Pyr (all rescues) send a personal plea to please get the box right, because their mom was threatening to cancel their subscription and buy their toys in other places. Again, received a cute email response (not nearly as cute as the email my 5 sent) basically saying we were wrong (really? It takes a month to ship something in the United States? And I have a transcript of the previous chat that specified what my BarkBox was supposed to contain, which it did not?!?)...and promises to make things better. THEN, literally 3 days later, another email was received about the glitch in their distribution center and OH - replacement items are now out of stock!

Many of your dog's toys should be interactive. Interactive play is very important for your dog because he needs active "people time." By focusing on a specific task, like repeatedly returning a ball, Kong® or Frisbee ®, or playing "hide-and-seek" with treats or toys, your dog can expend pent-up mental and physical energy in a limited amount of time and space. This greatly reduces stress due to confinement, isolation and/or boredom. For young, high-energy and untrained dogs, interactive play also offers an opportunity for socialization and helps them learn about appropriate and inappropriate behavior, such as jumping up or being mouthy.
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The BarkBox Dog Parent Survey was conducted by Kelton Global, a leading global insights research firm, between October 28th and November 4th, 2016 among 1,006 nationally representative Americans with dogs ages 18 and over, using an e-mail invitation and an online survey.  Quotas are set to ensure a reliable representation of the U.S. population 18 and over.

The study suggests that the craziest dog people might go into withdrawal when they are away from their dog and lean on technology for quick fixes. Many dog people admit they have watched their dog on a webcam (17%) or Skyped or FaceTimed with them while they were away (14%). “This is especially true of Millennials, who are more likely than non-Millennials (24% vs. 13%) to watch their dog on a webcam. In fact, Millennials are nearly three times as likely as their older counterparts (23% vs. 8%) to Skype or FaceTime their dog.”
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