Before meeting Kim and Kalee, I was struggling with my fitness goals. I would start out strong, but I just didn’t stay on track. With their motivation and support, I have not only stayed on track myself, but now I’m helping others reach their fitness and health goals! I’ve never felt or looked better, and I love being a part of their coaching team! Carrie Scott
Many of your dog's toys should be interactive. Interactive play is very important for your dog because he needs active "people time." By focusing on a specific task, like repeatedly returning a ball, Kong® or Frisbee ®, or playing "hide-and-seek" with treats or toys, your dog can expend pent-up mental and physical energy in a limited amount of time and space. This greatly reduces stress due to confinement, isolation and/or boredom. For young, high-energy and untrained dogs, interactive play also offers an opportunity for socialization and helps them learn about appropriate and inappropriate behavior, such as jumping up or being mouthy.
Andrew Chen is a longtime PC gamer, an automotive journalist and an avid deal hunter. His first PC had an 80 megahertz processor with 4 megabytes of RAM, light years away from the powerhouse gaming rigs he builds today. You can follow Andrew's high-speed sports car adventures over at 6SpeedOnline.com. As a Slickdealer for over 10 years, nothing makes him more excited than getting a freebie!
The study suggests that the craziest dog people might go into withdrawal when they are away from their dog and lean on technology for quick fixes. Many dog people admit they have watched their dog on a webcam (17%) or Skyped or FaceTimed with them while they were away (14%). “This is especially true of Millennials, who are more likely than non-Millennials (24% vs. 13%) to watch their dog on a webcam. In fact, Millennials are nearly three times as likely as their older counterparts (23% vs. 8%) to Skype or FaceTime their dog.”
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