Of course, all of the boxes have been scrutinized through our eyes. While I don’t claim that everyone will agree with our assessment, we do have some pretty high standards. Chester and Gretel are strong chewers so toys have to be quality, or have some kind of special sauce, to last around this house; we live in Seattle – the land of high-end, boutique pet stores; and I’ve seen some of the highest-quality, cutting edge products available at pet industry trade shows. We are not easy sells so I feel like when we say a subscription box is good, it really is.
My Lab/whippet mixed pup Nora (45 pounds, 8 years) rarely cares for any kind of traditional dog toy. She’s intimidated by toys that squeak, and toys that hit the floor with a loud thud. She doesn’t play fetch unless other dogs are around. However, she does take to treats meant for chewing. After trying bully sticks (hurt her gums), antlers (made a terrible sound against her teeth), and others, I came across the Himalayan Dog Chew: a softer chew made from yak and cow milk. It’s still tough enough that it lasts her a few days of on and off chewing but soft enough that I’m not worried it’ll hurt her mouth. Once the chew reaches the last nubbin—which you don’t want your dog to swallow whole—you can briefly pop it into the microwave to soften it into a cheesy treat.
The study also polled dog people about taking photos of their pup, and found that 20 percent of the pictures they take on their phone are of their dog – more than trips or vacations (15%), themselves (11%) or food (6%). In fact, more than two in five (42%) dog people have made a photo of their dog the feature photo on their phone or computer desktop.
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