BarkBox—the world’s largest subscription service for pets and their people—is changing all that with its monthly box of themed goodies, treats, and toys. With more than 50 million items shipped worldwide, they’ve taken a serious bite out of the pet supply market—and these self-described “crazy dog people” show no signs of easing up. Their passion for pups and the folks that care for them shines through at every brand interaction, from their #BarkBoxDay Insta hashtag to their email ‘pup-dates’, and the loyal community they’ve built reflects that customer-centric M.O.
Tico likes: I loved the stuffed "pup noodles"! Mom doesn't let me have any real noodles (something about allergies, I don't know what that word means), so this is the closest I could get to the real thing. I even wondered if there were real noodles inside, so just in case, I made sure to destroy the whole thing in under 10 minutes flat. There weren't any noodles.
My Lab/whippet mixed pup Nora (45 pounds, 8 years) rarely cares for any kind of traditional dog toy. She’s intimidated by toys that squeak, and toys that hit the floor with a loud thud. She doesn’t play fetch unless other dogs are around. However, she does take to treats meant for chewing. After trying bully sticks (hurt her gums), antlers (made a terrible sound against her teeth), and others, I came across the Himalayan Dog Chew: a softer chew made from yak and cow milk. It’s still tough enough that it lasts her a few days of on and off chewing but soft enough that I’m not worried it’ll hurt her mouth. Once the chew reaches the last nubbin—which you don’t want your dog to swallow whole—you can briefly pop it into the microwave to soften it into a cheesy treat.
Sarah has loved and trained both dogs and horses from a very early age. Her Staffordshire bull terrier, Mona, is trained as both a therapy dog and disaster stress relief dog. In addition, Sarah has trained her German Shepherd, Soren, as a service dog. Before starting her full-time writing business, Sarah worked with a top pet food company as a consultant to veterinarians conducting weekly classes on canine and feline nutrition for the doctors and staff. Read more posts from Sarah...
The study also polled dog people about taking photos of their pup, and found that 20 percent of the pictures they take on their phone are of their dog – more than trips or vacations (15%), themselves (11%) or food (6%). In fact, more than two in five (42%) dog people have made a photo of their dog the feature photo on their phone or computer desktop.
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