I’m super impressed with how far BarkBox has come since our first time trying it in 2012, They were founded in 2011 (they were the first subscription box I ever heard of) and have the longest time, out of all of the boxes available, to perfect their box just for your dog. And that they did. As they put it, “Having shipped over 50 million toys and treats so far, we’ve learned a ton about what engages dogs.”

Giving your dog a new toy is an exercise in natural selection. No matter how cute or pricey it is, there’s some chance that your pup will ignore the new plaything or rapidly tear it to shreds, either way leaving it for dead. Here we present the survivors: the toys that our pups have verified to be good for hours, or even years, of play that’s engaging, ferocious, and cute.
Every dog has his own unique preferences for toys, but the Wobble Wag Giggle Ball appeals to all dogs by taking the shape of the most classic of dog toys — the ball. This interactive dog toy is more than just a ball, however. It is a noise-making toy that wobbles, bounces, and giggles. With its unique sounds and motion, this ball will engage your dog's natural instincts for play, working off his excess energy without draining yours.
"Hide and Seek" is a fun game for dogs to play. "Found" toys are often much more attractive. Making an interactive game out of finding toys or treats is a good rainy-day activity for your dog, using up energy without the need for a lot of space. For example, scattering a handful of kibble in the grass or on a patterned carpet will require your dog to use his nose to find the food.
My Lab/whippet mixed pup Nora (45 pounds, 8 years) rarely cares for any kind of traditional dog toy. She’s intimidated by toys that squeak, and toys that hit the floor with a loud thud. She doesn’t play fetch unless other dogs are around. However, she does take to treats meant for chewing. After trying bully sticks (hurt her gums), antlers (made a terrible sound against her teeth), and others, I came across the Himalayan Dog Chew: a softer chew made from yak and cow milk. It’s still tough enough that it lasts her a few days of on and off chewing but soft enough that I’m not worried it’ll hurt her mouth. Once the chew reaches the last nubbin—which you don’t want your dog to swallow whole—you can briefly pop it into the microwave to soften it into a cheesy treat.
Consumer products know that until you enter your card details, you haven't made the decision. There will be a drop-off at that point. So this allows them to capture you in their system even if you don't complete the purchase. If you sign up after this, great. If you don't, then expect nurturing emails over the next few weeks until you come back and get the box for your dog.
KitNipBox is a monthly subscription box just for cats. Each month, expect a themed selection of toys and treats for your kitty! None of the food products in the box are made in China, though some of the toys may be. There is a “no treat” option for cats with allergies and food sensitivities, too. All KitNip Box toys are thoroughly assessed for quality and safety by the KitNip Box team.

My pittie (Snoop, 55 pounds, 4 years) loves to destroy his toys, and the Chompster Mash toys from BarkShop are made with the intention of being destroyed. Even so, they tend to last much longer than the other plush creatures I buy Snoop—some for weeks! The three-eyed, squeaker-filled Goosie Goon is a good place to start. While they’re not cheap—especially considering that they meet the trash can before too long—they are the only toys that can keep Snoop occupied for hours. Bonus: BarkShop has a loyalty program called the Destroyers Club, where you can earn credits on future purchases if you share photos of your pup destroying these toys. Who doesn’t love sharing photos of their pup?


The study suggests that the craziest dog people might go into withdrawal when they are away from their dog and lean on technology for quick fixes. Many dog people admit they have watched their dog on a webcam (17%) or Skyped or FaceTimed with them while they were away (14%). “This is especially true of Millennials, who are more likely than non-Millennials (24% vs. 13%) to watch their dog on a webcam. In fact, Millennials are nearly three times as likely as their older counterparts (23% vs. 8%) to Skype or FaceTime their dog.”
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