The BarkBox Dog Parent Survey was conducted by Kelton Global, a leading global insights research firm, between October 28th and November 4th, 2016 among 1,006 nationally representative Americans with dogs ages 18 and over, using an e-mail invitation and an online survey.  Quotas are set to ensure a reliable representation of the U.S. population 18 and over.

Like several corporate replies to others' reviews, I also have been informed by corporate that a "hiccup in the warehouse" is delaying August orders. Zero information was provided by the company up front to explain this problem. I attempted a chat with customer service last week only to discover that there is no chat. I had to leave a message, which wasn't returned. Then I emailed customer service about an ETA. That prompted a corporate reply with the as-now-standard "hiccup in the warehouse" explanation. I was told our August box is "still on the way." That doesn't answer my ETA question.
Because of the way people relate to their pets now (about 44 percent of millennials alone consider their pets as “starter children”), Bark is able to captivate two major audiences: dog owners and dog people. “Our audience is just people who love dogs,” said Stacie Grissom, head of content. “We start conversations about dogs and form relationships with people around dogs in general. And 85 percent of our content doesn’t even mention BarkBox specifically.”

The study suggests that the craziest dog people might go into withdrawal when they are away from their dog and lean on technology for quick fixes. Many dog people admit they have watched their dog on a webcam (17%) or Skyped or FaceTimed with them while they were away (14%). “This is especially true of Millennials, who are more likely than non-Millennials (24% vs. 13%) to watch their dog on a webcam. In fact, Millennials are nearly three times as likely as their older counterparts (23% vs. 8%) to Skype or FaceTime their dog.”
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